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[personal profile] hawkwing_lb
Books 2017: 65-74


65. A. Merc Rustad, So You Want to be a Robot. Lethe Press, 2017.

Read for review for Locus. Short stories. Not usually my thing, but pretty okay.


66. Nicky Drayden, The Prey of Gods. HarperCollins, 2017.

Read for review for Locus. Chaotic but good.


67. Tanya Huff, A Peace Divided. DAW/Titan Books, 2017.

Read for column for Tor.com. Lots of fun.


68. Laura Lam, False Hearts. Tor, 2016.

Read for column for Tor.com. Really good near-future thriller.


69. Wendy N. Wagner, Oath of Dogs. Angry Robot Books, 2017.

Read for review for Locus. Interesting science fiction with mystical twist.


70. Jack Campbell, The Genesis Fleet: Vanguard. Titan, 2017.

Read for review for Locus. Campbell is not getting any more imaginative.


71. Sarah Gailey, River of Teeth. Tor.com Publishing, 2017.

Read for column. Interesting novella.


nonfiction


72. bell hooks, Outlaw Culture. Routledge Classics, 2006. (Originally published 1994.)

I'd never really grasped the ways in which bell hooks is a foundational thinker for intersectional feminism before picking up this collection of essays. It is an uneven essay collection, and its referents are now nearly a quarter-century out of date, but much of what she has to say doesn't seem radical to me - in part because over those two and a half decades, they became part of the approaches to feminism that predominate among the people from whom I learned about feminist theory and praxis. (They are still radical, mind you.)

Reading this collection has made me want to read more of bell hooks' work, which is an excellent thing for any collection.


73. Linda M. Heywood, Njinga of Angola: Africa's Warrior Queen. Harvard University Press, 2017.

I want to write more about this biography of a 17th-century African queen who just did not quit and seems to have been immensely astute as a war-leader, as a diplomatic, and as a politician overall (except possibly in arranging the inheritance of her kingdom, but one cannot blame someone for not keeping things in order after they're dead). But in brief, it is a fascinating examination of a woman who the Portuguese colonisers saw as a "devil queen," and of her context.


74. Nancy Marie Brown, Ivory Vikings. St. Martin's Griffin, 2016. (Originally published 2015.)

Brown uses the Lewis chessmen, famous pieces found on the island of Lewis in Scotland in the early 19th century, as a lens through which to examine the late medieval Scandinavian world, its trade connections, and its culture. Brown is interested in the origins of the Lewis chessmen, and sets forth the arguments for where they might have been made, although it is clear her sympathies lie with the theory which ascribes them to Iceland in the late 12th or very early 13th century. (Brown makes a persuasive stab at ascribing them to the hand of an individual ivory-carver, a women named as Margaret the Adroit in the Saga of Bishop Pall - not a saga that has been translated into English.)

Brown is a careful historian, nuanced in her treatment of the evidence, and cautiously qualifying any sweeping claims. But she is also an imaginative historian, and an evocative one. Her knowledge of the Scandinavian world and the Icelandic sagas shines through, and her ability to write both clearly and entertainingly about matters of which yr. humble correspondent knows very little is a rare gift among historians. This is fun history. I approve of it.

Date: 2017-05-10 06:28 pm (UTC)
sovay: (I Claudius)
From: [personal profile] sovay
much of what she has to say doesn't seem radical to me - in part because over those two and a half decades, they became part of the approaches to feminism that predominate among the people from whom I learned about feminist theory and praxis. (They are still radical, mind you.)

I love being able to see where and how that happens.

Date: 2017-05-10 06:49 pm (UTC)
hrj: (Default)
From: [personal profile] hrj
74. Nancy Marie Brown, Ivory Vikings.

The last time I was in Europe (a month spent on 3 conferences, a wedding, and dissertation research) I got a replica set of the Lewis chessmen as a present for my cat sitter. (I think they fudged the designs in order to get a full complement of pieces.) I may keep an eye peeled for this book because it's the sort of odd little material culture thing I collect.

Date: 2017-05-10 06:50 pm (UTC)
hrj: (Default)
From: [personal profile] hrj
When I say, "keep an eye peeled" I actually mean in the book room at the Medieval Studies Congress to which I am in transit at the moment.

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