hawkwing_lb: (DA 2 scaring the piss)
So, I've been invited to participate in a convention. As a panelist, like.

I've never been before and I'd likely not be going if I hadn't been invited, because OH MY THESIS GOD and also WHERE HAS MY MONEY GONE? - but! I am going, barring disaster.

Octocon 2013, The Irish National Science Fiction Convention, 12/10/2013 to 13/10/2013, The Camden Court Hotel, Camden St, Dublin 2.

13:00 Sat - Pavilion - Masterclass in Contemporary Fantasy
The third in our annual masterclass series, asking which Fantasy works released in recent years should you be reading!

15:00 Sat - Tivoli - Mapping the Fantastic
Using the small space we explore to see the whole unreal world.

16:00 Sat - Pavilion - Best 2013 Books for Award Consideration
Nominations for the Hugos to be awarded in 2014 opens in January, what books are worth your time for reading?

11:00 Sun - Tivoli - Ageism in Genre
Its nearly always the plucky young hero.

13:00 Sun - Tivoli - What Makes a Hero?
From the classics to modern fiction, how has the vision of heroism changed?

(The organiser-person hasn't told me who else will be on these panels.)
hawkwing_lb: (CM JJ What you had to do)
Today, despite feeling as though possessed of an alcohol-free hangover, I went to town and saw people whom I haven't seen for months. My people. They are geeky and wonderful and I miss them much.

I also have preliminary weekly aims for the first part of the year. They are:

1. Write 1K-1.5K thesis words
2. Write one book review of 500-800 words
3. Translate 1 Perseus section of either Homer or set text
4. Translate 1-2 pages of the modern Greek children's book
5. Translate 1 page of Italian excavation report
6. (Most optional:) Write 1K-1.5K fiction words

1 x jujutsu
2 x karate
1 x Escrima
1-2 x climbing
2 x 2-2.5 miles running intervals (30 minutes).

We will try this, and see how things go.
hawkwing_lb: (Anders blue flare)
I'm sitting in a coffee shop, four days before Christmas, working on my thesis. It's ten to four and twilight is blue-grey between the buildings, and for reasons that I cannot explain I feel in great charity with the world.

Barring acts of malevolent deity and natural disasters, in the spring I'm going back to Greece for a six-week internship. The internship is part-time: I'll have time left over to work on my own research. If all goes well, I'll be home for June: if everything comes right, I'll be away again in July or August, back to the land of sunlight and stark shadows in the season of the heat.

It might be hard, but so far, the PhD is being so damn worth it.
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
The more I learn, the more I need to learn.

I've marked off the most immediately necessary Greek revision from my to-do list. Now I need to start roughing out an outline for my paper, "Sensory dimensions to healing cult in the Graeco-Roman East: the Asklepieia at Pergamon and at Kos."

Of course, the contemplate sensory experience is impossible to begin to discuss in a short paper. I'll be looking at the sense-experience of entering the two sanctuaries, along the monumental road and through the propylon at Pergamon, and through the monumental entryway at Kos (concerning which the internet has not been helpful in the way of plans). I will be relying on the phenomenology of Christopher Tilley, whose quote from 1994's A Phenomenology of Landscape has proven very useful to my thinking:

"Perceptual space is the egocentric space perceived and encountered by individuals in their daily practices. The centre of such a space is grounded in individual perception of distances and directions, natural objects and cultural creations. This space is always relative and qualitative. Distance and direction are perceived as near or far, this way or that way, moving along one track or another. A perceptual space is one that links patterns of individual intentionality to bodily movement and perception. It is a space of personality, of encounter and emotional attachment. It is the constructed life-space of the individual, involving feelings and memories giving rise to a sense of awe, emotion, wonder or anguish in spatial encounters. Such a space may as often as not be felt rather than verbalised. It creates personal significances for an individual in his or her bodily routines - places remembered and places of affective importance." [p16]

Space affects. It creates in the one who experiences it both attitudes and emotions, even receptiveness to different states of being. The act of approaching a healing sanctuary becomes more affecting when the built or natural landscape induces a sense of awe. Perhaps a receptiveness to being-healed, or to thinking oneself healed.

I'm hoping to find some material in Aelius Aristides to add to my considerations. I have twenty-five minutes for the paper, so I can't really write more than 2,500 words, I don't think. (Maybe 3,000, if I talk quickly. But I'll have a powerpoint, too.) So that gives me about a thousand words of "Describe What You See," a few hundred words for AA (who should at least have some sort of perspective), and a thousand words for the use of phenomenological analysis - the why and the how and the wherefore, as opposed to the what.

This sounds like a plan for going on with. So. Starting tomorrow afternoon, I will be reading AA, and on Wednesday I should be about ready to move on to "Describe What You See." (My photocopy bill is about to go through the roof. I can tell...)

But right now, I think I'll put on some vol-au-vents for supper and watch last week's Nikita.

hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
The more I learn, the more I need to learn.

I've marked off the most immediately necessary Greek revision from my to-do list. Now I need to start roughing out an outline for my paper, "Sensory dimensions to healing cult in the Graeco-Roman East: the Asklepieia at Pergamon and at Kos."

Of course, the contemplate sensory experience is impossible to begin to discuss in a short paper. I'll be looking at the sense-experience of entering the two sanctuaries, along the monumental road and through the propylon at Pergamon, and through the monumental entryway at Kos (concerning which the internet has not been helpful in the way of plans). I will be relying on the phenomenology of Christopher Tilley, whose quote from 1994's A Phenomenology of Landscape has proven very useful to my thinking:

"Perceptual space is the egocentric space perceived and encountered by individuals in their daily practices. The centre of such a space is grounded in individual perception of distances and directions, natural objects and cultural creations. This space is always relative and qualitative. Distance and direction are perceived as near or far, this way or that way, moving along one track or another. A perceptual space is one that links patterns of individual intentionality to bodily movement and perception. It is a space of personality, of encounter and emotional attachment. It is the constructed life-space of the individual, involving feelings and memories giving rise to a sense of awe, emotion, wonder or anguish in spatial encounters. Such a space may as often as not be felt rather than verbalised. It creates personal significances for an individual in his or her bodily routines - places remembered and places of affective importance." [p16]

Space affects. It creates in the one who experiences it both attitudes and emotions, even receptiveness to different states of being. The act of approaching a healing sanctuary becomes more affecting when the built or natural landscape induces a sense of awe. Perhaps a receptiveness to being-healed, or to thinking oneself healed.

I'm hoping to find some material in Aelius Aristides to add to my considerations. I have twenty-five minutes for the paper, so I can't really write more than 2,500 words, I don't think. (Maybe 3,000, if I talk quickly. But I'll have a powerpoint, too.) So that gives me about a thousand words of "Describe What You See," a few hundred words for AA (who should at least have some sort of perspective), and a thousand words for the use of phenomenological analysis - the why and the how and the wherefore, as opposed to the what.

This sounds like a plan for going on with. So. Starting tomorrow afternoon, I will be reading AA, and on Wednesday I should be about ready to move on to "Describe What You See." (My photocopy bill is about to go through the roof. I can tell...)

But right now, I think I'll put on some vol-au-vents for supper and watch last week's Nikita.

hawkwing_lb: (Default)
No, I'm not talking about my government's plan to force everyone to emigrate, allowing them to have the country to themselves. (I could wish I were joking about that.)

No, this is my very own two-year plan.

2YP AIMS

-- core thesis complete
-- complete novel #1.
-- reading competence in ancient Greek
-- reading competence in modern Italian
-- have investigated freelance writing opportunities to some limited degree.
-- basic reading skillz in German

Followed by! The (still tentative) Five-Year Plan!

*sinister drumroll*

5YP AIMS

-- nonfiction book proposal for a) thesis and b) something else relevent to my interests.
-- complete novel #2
-- reading competence in Greek, Italian, German, Latin.
-- send out complete novel #1.




...No, I'm not really sure how I'm going to be able to succeed at this yet. On the other hand, research is what I want to do, and if that means I have to live on the dole and eat beans and rice for a large part of my life, and scrimp my pennies for ILL, I think I could accept this outcome.

Not gracefully, but I could well accept it.

hawkwing_lb: (Default)
No, I'm not talking about my government's plan to force everyone to emigrate, allowing them to have the country to themselves. (I could wish I were joking about that.)

No, this is my very own two-year plan.

2YP AIMS

-- core thesis complete
-- complete novel #1.
-- reading competence in ancient Greek
-- reading competence in modern Italian
-- have investigated freelance writing opportunities to some limited degree.
-- basic reading skillz in German

Followed by! The (still tentative) Five-Year Plan!

*sinister drumroll*

5YP AIMS

-- nonfiction book proposal for a) thesis and b) something else relevent to my interests.
-- complete novel #2
-- reading competence in Greek, Italian, German, Latin.
-- send out complete novel #1.




...No, I'm not really sure how I'm going to be able to succeed at this yet. On the other hand, research is what I want to do, and if that means I have to live on the dole and eat beans and rice for a large part of my life, and scrimp my pennies for ILL, I think I could accept this outcome.

Not gracefully, but I could well accept it.

hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
One of the things I'm learning about myself -

I do learn. I'm a better person now than I was a year ago, two years ago, with a more nuanced understanding of the world and other people. I still fuck up, of course. I commit stupidity, as well as - on occasion - matchless self-pity.

But that's okay, isn't it? Because as long as I keep trying to learn, to do better, to improve a grasp of nuance, to be better -

You learn best from your mistakes. And other people's examples, too, but one's own mistakes do leave a stronger impression.

I've figured out, I think, what I want to do with my life. Which is something of a relief, and it's a relief to think it might actually be achievable. I'm drawn, overwhelmingly, to research, and rereading my thesis it looks like I'm not terrible at it.

It took me about two months to achieve that much perspective on those ten thousand words, and even now, the most I'm prepared to say is that as a piece of work, it doesn't actually suck. But that's an apprentice-piece, if that: scholarship has a lengthy apprenticeship, and with postgraduate work, and practice, I should improve.

It's problematic for me, I think, that my attraction is that of a generalist: everything is fascinating, and I'm not sure I'll ever muster the intense focus required to be an Authority in a single area of a single field - very few people do, after all, and mostly after a lifetime of directed labour. But that doesn't mean I can't shape myself into a perfectly adequate scholar within the areas I'm most interested in. Nor does it mean that I cannot take Mary Beard and Robin Lane Fox for my models, and strive in future years to write broad and accessible history with a sound scholarly foundation. (One may criticise Beard's claims to break new ground with her every new book, particularly when some of these have been largely syntheses of existing scholarship, and Lane Fox's biases as a Classically trained Classicist show through in his material, but no one can say they don't have a very solid foundation in their work.) And there's no harm in aiming high - I know both Beard and Lane Fox are successful professors as well as writers of decent popular history - since at least by so aiming, I don't run the risk of shooting myself in the foot.

I know, at this point, that I can do research and write it up with a reasonable competence that can only improve with practice. Despite its many frustrations and moments of flailing despair, writing my thesis was an immensely satisfying experience, and - now that I've had a little time to recover - one that I wouldn't hesitate to embark upon again.

Research, after all, is about accuracy, coherence, relevance, structure, and - in good history writing - the empathy of imagination which gives the past life. And bar the last, those are learned skills. It's only the desire that can't be learned. The passion, if you will.

Or the obsession, if you prefer.

While I still want to write novels, stories, I've no confidence in my ability to do so. Nor am I sure I want to split my attention and try to write seriously while working on something that could conceivably lead to a decent career.

The odds of earning a living as an academic are slightly better than earning a living as a writer. Something like one in twelve (or one in twenty: I understand it varies depending on your discipline) PhD graduates manage to make a career in a related field. What are the odds as a novelist? One in thirty? Worse? How many people who (finish, submit and) publish a novel go on to write full time without the support of a spouse?

Until someone tells me I've been accepted to an MLitt programme, of course, this is moot. And we'll see what happens this summer, and whether in this economy the parent and the government between them can float me long enough to acquire a postgrad degree.

But it is something of a relief, in the end, to actually know (part of) what I am, and where I want, primarily, to go. (The addiction to history books, for fun, after the first year of college, kind of clued me in to the fact that this passion is not one that'll easily suffer to be set aside.) I'm willing to do a lot, if it means I might, one day, write a small monograph that could be judged a worthy contribution to scholarship.

So we'll see. This summer I want to properly start myself on learning German and Italian, with Latin if I can manage it. Odds are against me finding employment, so I'll likely have time, if not money. And the backlog of books on the Unread shelves deserve some attention before I saunter off to learn Greek in foreign places (cash and situations permitting).

So, yeah. I'm feeling remarkably mellow and optimistic regarding my place in the world. That'll last all of a few days, I imagine, but I'll enjoy it while it lasts.
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
One of the things I'm learning about myself -

I do learn. I'm a better person now than I was a year ago, two years ago, with a more nuanced understanding of the world and other people. I still fuck up, of course. I commit stupidity, as well as - on occasion - matchless self-pity.

But that's okay, isn't it? Because as long as I keep trying to learn, to do better, to improve a grasp of nuance, to be better -

You learn best from your mistakes. And other people's examples, too, but one's own mistakes do leave a stronger impression.

I've figured out, I think, what I want to do with my life. Which is something of a relief, and it's a relief to think it might actually be achievable. I'm drawn, overwhelmingly, to research, and rereading my thesis it looks like I'm not terrible at it.

It took me about two months to achieve that much perspective on those ten thousand words, and even now, the most I'm prepared to say is that as a piece of work, it doesn't actually suck. But that's an apprentice-piece, if that: scholarship has a lengthy apprenticeship, and with postgraduate work, and practice, I should improve.

It's problematic for me, I think, that my attraction is that of a generalist: everything is fascinating, and I'm not sure I'll ever muster the intense focus required to be an Authority in a single area of a single field - very few people do, after all, and mostly after a lifetime of directed labour. But that doesn't mean I can't shape myself into a perfectly adequate scholar within the areas I'm most interested in. Nor does it mean that I cannot take Mary Beard and Robin Lane Fox for my models, and strive in future years to write broad and accessible history with a sound scholarly foundation. (One may criticise Beard's claims to break new ground with her every new book, particularly when some of these have been largely syntheses of existing scholarship, and Lane Fox's biases as a Classically trained Classicist show through in his material, but no one can say they don't have a very solid foundation in their work.) And there's no harm in aiming high - I know both Beard and Lane Fox are successful professors as well as writers of decent popular history - since at least by so aiming, I don't run the risk of shooting myself in the foot.

I know, at this point, that I can do research and write it up with a reasonable competence that can only improve with practice. Despite its many frustrations and moments of flailing despair, writing my thesis was an immensely satisfying experience, and - now that I've had a little time to recover - one that I wouldn't hesitate to embark upon again.

Research, after all, is about accuracy, coherence, relevance, structure, and - in good history writing - the empathy of imagination which gives the past life. And bar the last, those are learned skills. It's only the desire that can't be learned. The passion, if you will.

Or the obsession, if you prefer.

While I still want to write novels, stories, I've no confidence in my ability to do so. Nor am I sure I want to split my attention and try to write seriously while working on something that could conceivably lead to a decent career.

The odds of earning a living as an academic are slightly better than earning a living as a writer. Something like one in twelve (or one in twenty: I understand it varies depending on your discipline) PhD graduates manage to make a career in a related field. What are the odds as a novelist? One in thirty? Worse? How many people who (finish, submit and) publish a novel go on to write full time without the support of a spouse?

Until someone tells me I've been accepted to an MLitt programme, of course, this is moot. And we'll see what happens this summer, and whether in this economy the parent and the government between them can float me long enough to acquire a postgrad degree.

But it is something of a relief, in the end, to actually know (part of) what I am, and where I want, primarily, to go. (The addiction to history books, for fun, after the first year of college, kind of clued me in to the fact that this passion is not one that'll easily suffer to be set aside.) I'm willing to do a lot, if it means I might, one day, write a small monograph that could be judged a worthy contribution to scholarship.

So we'll see. This summer I want to properly start myself on learning German and Italian, with Latin if I can manage it. Odds are against me finding employment, so I'll likely have time, if not money. And the backlog of books on the Unread shelves deserve some attention before I saunter off to learn Greek in foreign places (cash and situations permitting).

So, yeah. I'm feeling remarkably mellow and optimistic regarding my place in the world. That'll last all of a few days, I imagine, but I'll enjoy it while it lasts.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Macbeth at the Abbey Theatre?

Made of win.

It seems to be a fairly faithful production. Not too minimal, but not flashy, either. I liked what they did. Some of the witchy stuff was translated into Irish. Lady Macbeth pulled off a seriously creepy murderous crazy vibe, and MacBeth seemed to be having the time of his life playing tortured ambition. Also, MacDuff and Malcolm? Very pretty. Very pretty.




Today was full of good things. Black stompy boots were acquired, which are good for walking and working and also stompy style. Also acquired was one Archaeology Society hoodie, of belated delivery. ("We Dig Dead People." And we have a weird sense of humour.)

I've put in train stuff to do with my postgrad applications, and must write my research proposal tomorrow. A very basic outline. Title, aims, two hundred words tops.

Right now I think I'm going to go sleep some more.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Macbeth at the Abbey Theatre?

Made of win.

It seems to be a fairly faithful production. Not too minimal, but not flashy, either. I liked what they did. Some of the witchy stuff was translated into Irish. Lady Macbeth pulled off a seriously creepy murderous crazy vibe, and MacBeth seemed to be having the time of his life playing tortured ambition. Also, MacDuff and Malcolm? Very pretty. Very pretty.




Today was full of good things. Black stompy boots were acquired, which are good for walking and working and also stompy style. Also acquired was one Archaeology Society hoodie, of belated delivery. ("We Dig Dead People." And we have a weird sense of humour.)

I've put in train stuff to do with my postgrad applications, and must write my research proposal tomorrow. A very basic outline. Title, aims, two hundred words tops.

Right now I think I'm going to go sleep some more.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
My thesis may not only be suitable for toilet paper after all. I declare myself to be relieved. Also slightly terrified, because now I have to make the mess that is draft 1.0 into a solid, intelligible, hopefully scholarly 2.0.

It should take about six weeks. Anyone want to read it when it's done?




In other news, this week's Criminal Minds episode was made of win. Even better than last week's one.




I have no brain. Perhaps I should look for it in the gym tomorrow.




I also need to find an extra two hundred euro somewhere to take a society trip to Budapest. It is now to take place after the thesis deadline, so I can contemplate going. On the other hand, maybe I should save the money and the itinerary and take a solo trip at the end of summer, so as not to miss any classes and not to kill any persons whom I usually like but probably would not tolerate well in a hostel dorm-room...
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
My thesis may not only be suitable for toilet paper after all. I declare myself to be relieved. Also slightly terrified, because now I have to make the mess that is draft 1.0 into a solid, intelligible, hopefully scholarly 2.0.

It should take about six weeks. Anyone want to read it when it's done?




In other news, this week's Criminal Minds episode was made of win. Even better than last week's one.




I have no brain. Perhaps I should look for it in the gym tomorrow.




I also need to find an extra two hundred euro somewhere to take a society trip to Budapest. It is now to take place after the thesis deadline, so I can contemplate going. On the other hand, maybe I should save the money and the itinerary and take a solo trip at the end of summer, so as not to miss any classes and not to kill any persons whom I usually like but probably would not tolerate well in a hostel dorm-room...

The Plan

Dec. 15th, 2009 03:31 pm
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
Come Thursday, I can hide under a rock.

Two days. One day and a half, even. I can starting hiding under a rock as soon as I'm done climbing on Wednesday night.

(Hiding under a rock is good. This year has been too long, and there have been too many people in it. I like people. People are good. But I need some alone time when I am a]not sick and b]not working on thesis to read books by the fire. My big rock, I will not show you it, I will hide under it.)

The Plan

Dec. 15th, 2009 03:31 pm
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
Come Thursday, I can hide under a rock.

Two days. One day and a half, even. I can starting hiding under a rock as soon as I'm done climbing on Wednesday night.

(Hiding under a rock is good. This year has been too long, and there have been too many people in it. I like people. People are good. But I need some alone time when I am a]not sick and b]not working on thesis to read books by the fire. My big rock, I will not show you it, I will hide under it.)
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Well, I'm kind of disappointed. After investigation, it turns out that if I want to work on another continental landmass next summer, I'd need at least eighteen hundred euro straight off the bat, for visas and flights and other such requirements (like, say, affording someplace to live and some food to eat while I hunted down something resembling a paying job).

Needless to say, that kind of money does not exist in my near future. So I shall be staying home and searching for fools people who would like to employ a smart hardworking graduate.

*insert hopeful smile here*

Maybe by then the Irish economic world will have stopped ending, although I doubt it.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Well, I'm kind of disappointed. After investigation, it turns out that if I want to work on another continental landmass next summer, I'd need at least eighteen hundred euro straight off the bat, for visas and flights and other such requirements (like, say, affording someplace to live and some food to eat while I hunted down something resembling a paying job).

Needless to say, that kind of money does not exist in my near future. So I shall be staying home and searching for fools people who would like to employ a smart hardworking graduate.

*insert hopeful smile here*

Maybe by then the Irish economic world will have stopped ending, although I doubt it.

Plans

Jul. 30th, 2009 01:31 am
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Tomorrow is the first day of the new me.

I've killed my wind, not running while at Silchester. I need to get it back. I need to get back my fingerstrength and my upper body strength, too: that's declined as well, but not half as badly as my wind.

I need to complete the holdover Arch Soc business before the start of the new session: to whit, typing up the library catalogue.

I need to brush up my Greek, Latin, and French - which is about two hours' worth of work five times a week.

I need to start my final year thesis, which I think is probably going to be either "Isis in Greece: the Hellenistic to the Roman periods" or "Isis in Greco-Roman Egypt: change and continuity" depending on what the library has on offer; it might be "Isis in Rome: cult, class, and orientalism" but that is a fallback of the last resort. That's also at least two hours a day, five days a week: probably closer to three, since I want to get a good start before September 21 and Freshers' Week.

I want to write again. Call it an hour of work five days a week.

I also want to do karate again. We'll see how that works out.

So tomorrow, I need to be in town by twelve at the latest: in the library until five or I get tired, and in the gym thereafter. Possibly it may be best if I go to the gym first, for the first couple of days. We'll see.

So the plan is, starting from next week, to spend six hours (not including lunch) in the library every day, and two-three hours either in the gym, or climbing, or both. Which gives me six or seven weeks on a fulltime schedule, or thereabouts, before class begins and everything changes again.

Goals: start thesis, run a continuous 1.5 miles, lead a 5 route with no more than one pause, consistent 6A climbing, write 15000 words, type up library catalogue.

That'll do for going on with, I reckon.

Plans

Jul. 30th, 2009 01:31 am
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Tomorrow is the first day of the new me.

I've killed my wind, not running while at Silchester. I need to get it back. I need to get back my fingerstrength and my upper body strength, too: that's declined as well, but not half as badly as my wind.

I need to complete the holdover Arch Soc business before the start of the new session: to whit, typing up the library catalogue.

I need to brush up my Greek, Latin, and French - which is about two hours' worth of work five times a week.

I need to start my final year thesis, which I think is probably going to be either "Isis in Greece: the Hellenistic to the Roman periods" or "Isis in Greco-Roman Egypt: change and continuity" depending on what the library has on offer; it might be "Isis in Rome: cult, class, and orientalism" but that is a fallback of the last resort. That's also at least two hours a day, five days a week: probably closer to three, since I want to get a good start before September 21 and Freshers' Week.

I want to write again. Call it an hour of work five days a week.

I also want to do karate again. We'll see how that works out.

So tomorrow, I need to be in town by twelve at the latest: in the library until five or I get tired, and in the gym thereafter. Possibly it may be best if I go to the gym first, for the first couple of days. We'll see.

So the plan is, starting from next week, to spend six hours (not including lunch) in the library every day, and two-three hours either in the gym, or climbing, or both. Which gives me six or seven weeks on a fulltime schedule, or thereabouts, before class begins and everything changes again.

Goals: start thesis, run a continuous 1.5 miles, lead a 5 route with no more than one pause, consistent 6A climbing, write 15000 words, type up library catalogue.

That'll do for going on with, I reckon.
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
The cat remains at the vet until Monday at least, but we visited him today. He is alert and making noise, and expressed his feelings at seeing us by purring, head-butting, and rubbing white fur all over my black t-shirt.

I've packed my ruck for Thursday. I only managed to fit three books, plus my language books: I daresay I'm going to run out most pathetically. I have to bring a shoulder bag to carry plate, bowl, and mug, not to mention toothbrush, toothpaste, and other tools of cleanliness, because there's no way I can fit more crap into my ruck: I had to strap tent, sleeping bag, and air mattress to the outside, and I can't figure out how I'm going to bring a pillow. (Something to worry about later, no doubt.)

I'm rather terrified about this business, considering the appalling fuckup I made of last time's attempt to get dig training. But that is also something to worry about later.

I think I'm out of things to worry about today. That means, I think, I get to amuse myself, if I can. :)s

Profile

hawkwing_lb: (Default)
hawkwing_lb

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
23 45678
9101112131415
16171819202122
2324 2526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 26th, 2017 12:32 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios