hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
My two newest repeat-to-death songs: Cloud Cult, "When Water Comes To Life", (thanks, [livejournal.com profile] tanaise) and The Gaslight Anthem, "Blue Jeans & White T-shirts".

Today, I was in college from 1100 until 2030. Four hours of classes, a meeting, and essay. The essay is still Not Done, but the sucker is dying tomorrow, if I have to skip climbing to do it.

I also have a new blue hooded jumper (archaeology class bought in to apparel) with a college crest and a legend reading (below a big black hoplite helmet) "My Career is in Ruins".

Bad puns are us. :)

So sleepy now.
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
My two newest repeat-to-death songs: Cloud Cult, "When Water Comes To Life", (thanks, [livejournal.com profile] tanaise) and The Gaslight Anthem, "Blue Jeans & White T-shirts".

Today, I was in college from 1100 until 2030. Four hours of classes, a meeting, and essay. The essay is still Not Done, but the sucker is dying tomorrow, if I have to skip climbing to do it.

I also have a new blue hooded jumper (archaeology class bought in to apparel) with a college crest and a legend reading (below a big black hoplite helmet) "My Career is in Ruins".

Bad puns are us. :)

So sleepy now.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
I am so relieved I could cry. My 'straight on til morning' deathmarch has furnished me one [1] draft essay. (It is presently 0415, and I don't care.) My legs might be stiff as hell from sitting here for hours, but I don't care.

Discuss the role women played in ancient Greco-Roman society. What roles did women typically play? Consider Paul's teachings about women in 1 Corinthians, especially 1 Corinthians 11, and compare it to the broader social context. Is Paul, comparatively, more feminist or more misogynist?

The essay invites three theses' worth of information. Women in the Greco-Roman world. Women and Paul. Paul and women. The use of the terms 'feminist' and 'misogynist' in assessing the first century C.E. I am going to throw something at my lecturer when I see him again. Possibly something sharp.

When I wake up, I get to do it all over again, on a different topic.

I mean, none of these are due till at least Thursday? But I want them done and out of my damn way before deadline anxiety chokes me.

(I am not at my best with deadline anxiety. It makes me distinctly unpleasant, and even more inclined to nasty snark.)
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
I am so relieved I could cry. My 'straight on til morning' deathmarch has furnished me one [1] draft essay. (It is presently 0415, and I don't care.) My legs might be stiff as hell from sitting here for hours, but I don't care.

Discuss the role women played in ancient Greco-Roman society. What roles did women typically play? Consider Paul's teachings about women in 1 Corinthians, especially 1 Corinthians 11, and compare it to the broader social context. Is Paul, comparatively, more feminist or more misogynist?

The essay invites three theses' worth of information. Women in the Greco-Roman world. Women and Paul. Paul and women. The use of the terms 'feminist' and 'misogynist' in assessing the first century C.E. I am going to throw something at my lecturer when I see him again. Possibly something sharp.

When I wake up, I get to do it all over again, on a different topic.

I mean, none of these are due till at least Thursday? But I want them done and out of my damn way before deadline anxiety chokes me.

(I am not at my best with deadline anxiety. It makes me distinctly unpleasant, and even more inclined to nasty snark.)
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
Books 2008: 159

159. Janny Wurts, Stormed Fortress.

I've been reading Wurts's The Wars of Light and Shadow books since I was ten? Eleven? For at least the last decade, anyway. I have a very great fondness for them, from the fraught, occasionally overwrought language, to the very real characters and the vast landscape of Athera, to the insoluble ethical dilemmas that arise when people of good will and intentions are forced into conflict.

Stormed Fortress is the crowning volume to the sub-series The Alliance of Light. It's huge, complex, and full of fabulous moments. Every triumph is bittersweet. But for the first time since the beginning, it seems possible that the conflict between Arithon and his half-brother Lysaer might one day end without the death of one or the other. All things considered, it is a hopeful book. And I thoroughly enjoyed it. (And continue to wonder at how Wurts can juggle such a vast cast over such an immense story.)

I hope, however, that the interval between this and the next volume is shorter than the interval between Traitor's Knot and this. I understand books take time to write, but in excess of two years seems a rather lengthy interval.

(I know I shouldn't complain. But this is one series where the but I want more! is hard to set aside.)



A long walk with seven minutes of running in the middle yesterday. An even longer walk with six minutes of running in the middle of it today. (It would have been seven minutes, but the tide was farther in than it was yesterday, so I had to slow down to pick my way across some rocks.) I am now capable of moderate optimism, provided I don't think too much.

(Nothing is either good nor bad but thinking makes it so.)

My essays proceed. Progress is like wading through waist-high treacle. But it is some progress, nonetheless.
hawkwing_lb: (Criminal Minds JJ what you had to do)
Books 2008: 159

159. Janny Wurts, Stormed Fortress.

I've been reading Wurts's The Wars of Light and Shadow books since I was ten? Eleven? For at least the last decade, anyway. I have a very great fondness for them, from the fraught, occasionally overwrought language, to the very real characters and the vast landscape of Athera, to the insoluble ethical dilemmas that arise when people of good will and intentions are forced into conflict.

Stormed Fortress is the crowning volume to the sub-series The Alliance of Light. It's huge, complex, and full of fabulous moments. Every triumph is bittersweet. But for the first time since the beginning, it seems possible that the conflict between Arithon and his half-brother Lysaer might one day end without the death of one or the other. All things considered, it is a hopeful book. And I thoroughly enjoyed it. (And continue to wonder at how Wurts can juggle such a vast cast over such an immense story.)

I hope, however, that the interval between this and the next volume is shorter than the interval between Traitor's Knot and this. I understand books take time to write, but in excess of two years seems a rather lengthy interval.

(I know I shouldn't complain. But this is one series where the but I want more! is hard to set aside.)



A long walk with seven minutes of running in the middle yesterday. An even longer walk with six minutes of running in the middle of it today. (It would have been seven minutes, but the tide was farther in than it was yesterday, so I had to slow down to pick my way across some rocks.) I am now capable of moderate optimism, provided I don't think too much.

(Nothing is either good nor bad but thinking makes it so.)

My essays proceed. Progress is like wading through waist-high treacle. But it is some progress, nonetheless.
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
I made it to the climbing wall, but not to the library. I have no endurance and less wind, and despite taking it easy and doing the five simplest routes, my shoulders feel like melted cheese strings.

Over the next three days, the wall's closed while they reset the routes, so I have time to claw my wind back. And the library has a book for me, so maybe, just maybe, I will get actual work done tomorrow, and not just faffing about in a bookshop. (It was very reassuring to visit a bookshop. It merely did not involve the experience of Getting Stuff Done.)

(Well, okay, I bought a book. Some books. Nonetheless, this is still Not Work.)

One day soon I will have to actually do some writing of words that have not to do with essays. Or give up the hope of finishing a novel in the next, oh, six years. (Is one a writer if one means to write but other things keep getting in the way? I think not.) But essays first, alas. I am very weary of essays.
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
I made it to the climbing wall, but not to the library. I have no endurance and less wind, and despite taking it easy and doing the five simplest routes, my shoulders feel like melted cheese strings.

Over the next three days, the wall's closed while they reset the routes, so I have time to claw my wind back. And the library has a book for me, so maybe, just maybe, I will get actual work done tomorrow, and not just faffing about in a bookshop. (It was very reassuring to visit a bookshop. It merely did not involve the experience of Getting Stuff Done.)

(Well, okay, I bought a book. Some books. Nonetheless, this is still Not Work.)

One day soon I will have to actually do some writing of words that have not to do with essays. Or give up the hope of finishing a novel in the next, oh, six years. (Is one a writer if one means to write but other things keep getting in the way? I think not.) But essays first, alas. I am very weary of essays.
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
A most excellent day, of the kind that comes along once in a very great while and leaves you scratching your head and saying to yourself, I didn't expect to enjoy that half as much as I did.

(This perhaps tells you entirely too much about my approach to life, that I was vaguely shocked to have a day that was not only painless and guiltless, but also reasonably fun.)

So. I had a late and pleasant breakfast out, and headed in to the afternoon sessions of the "War and Society in the Ancient World" colloquium at the Royal Irish Academy. I have never before been in the RIA's building on Dawson St., and it is fairly impressive: very old world, and a lovely reading room, and the lecture room actually in the library space itself, a marvellous high-ceilinged room, three storeys high, with books all around and manuscripts such as the Annals of the Four Masters on display in glass cases around the sides.

Damned uncomfortable seats, though.

So, anyway, I listened to a very interesting paper by Prof. Brian Campbell, Queen's University Belfast, on society and the army in the Roman empire. Some very cogent discussion of the army's relationship to civilian society in peace, war, and its frequent de facto role as an army of occupation in the provinces; mention of the economic and social implications of military presence, and some talk of military ideology. He made the point quite clearly that the emperor's ability to discipline and direct the armies was constrained by the emperor's reliance on the armies to maintain his rule.

The other paper was given by Dr. Kieran McGroarty, of NUI Maynooth, on the behaviour of Alexander the Great during his conquest of Persia, and how it perhaps did not exactly fit the model of a conquering army: Alexander made a number of gestures - many gestures - towards accommodation with his defeated enemies, and even went so far as to portray himself as a legitimate successor to Darius. Definitely some interesting stuff to think about there.

And climbing. Climbing. I conquered the red 5+, at last, performed satisfactorily on two other 5+ routes, and did a wee bit of traversing. Despite not doing a whole hell of a lot, I'm pretty happy with what I did do. (Triumph! Seven routes, now, that I can do or have done.)
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
A most excellent day, of the kind that comes along once in a very great while and leaves you scratching your head and saying to yourself, I didn't expect to enjoy that half as much as I did.

(This perhaps tells you entirely too much about my approach to life, that I was vaguely shocked to have a day that was not only painless and guiltless, but also reasonably fun.)

So. I had a late and pleasant breakfast out, and headed in to the afternoon sessions of the "War and Society in the Ancient World" colloquium at the Royal Irish Academy. I have never before been in the RIA's building on Dawson St., and it is fairly impressive: very old world, and a lovely reading room, and the lecture room actually in the library space itself, a marvellous high-ceilinged room, three storeys high, with books all around and manuscripts such as the Annals of the Four Masters on display in glass cases around the sides.

Damned uncomfortable seats, though.

So, anyway, I listened to a very interesting paper by Prof. Brian Campbell, Queen's University Belfast, on society and the army in the Roman empire. Some very cogent discussion of the army's relationship to civilian society in peace, war, and its frequent de facto role as an army of occupation in the provinces; mention of the economic and social implications of military presence, and some talk of military ideology. He made the point quite clearly that the emperor's ability to discipline and direct the armies was constrained by the emperor's reliance on the armies to maintain his rule.

The other paper was given by Dr. Kieran McGroarty, of NUI Maynooth, on the behaviour of Alexander the Great during his conquest of Persia, and how it perhaps did not exactly fit the model of a conquering army: Alexander made a number of gestures - many gestures - towards accommodation with his defeated enemies, and even went so far as to portray himself as a legitimate successor to Darius. Definitely some interesting stuff to think about there.

And climbing. Climbing. I conquered the red 5+, at last, performed satisfactorily on two other 5+ routes, and did a wee bit of traversing. Despite not doing a whole hell of a lot, I'm pretty happy with what I did do. (Triumph! Seven routes, now, that I can do or have done.)
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
Triumph! First draft essay done, at 2,300 words. That's a weight off my mind. Only two pieces of work to do in the next two weeks, now.

Climbing: did three routes I've done before, and did them if not straight, at least with only one pause apiece. Attempted three routes I've tried before: failed of them, though not utterly pathetically. Belayed a few new climbers and began learning how to lead climb. Lead climbing is hard. I look forward to doing more of it, and getting better. I haven't lost all my conditioning in two weeks, at least: I figure another week and a half, and I'll be back where I was before.

Did not start running again today. That will probably take place, if not tomorrow, at least next week. Tomorrow I am going to a symposium-thing in the Royal Irish Academy - a couple of lectures on Greco-Roman warfare, in the afternoon. (Technically, this symposium started tonight, but I wasn't going to skip climbing in favour of a lecture, and the morning ones tomorrow do not excite my interest sufficiently for me to crawl out of bed at the break of dawn. Does this make me weak? I suspect it does.)

Saturday, I think, I will take the day to myself and read All the Windwracked Stars.

...This is terribly banal. I wonder if I'll eventually stop writing about minutiae here. It'll be interesting to see if I still feel this way when I'm more awake and less hungry.
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
Triumph! First draft essay done, at 2,300 words. That's a weight off my mind. Only two pieces of work to do in the next two weeks, now.

Climbing: did three routes I've done before, and did them if not straight, at least with only one pause apiece. Attempted three routes I've tried before: failed of them, though not utterly pathetically. Belayed a few new climbers and began learning how to lead climb. Lead climbing is hard. I look forward to doing more of it, and getting better. I haven't lost all my conditioning in two weeks, at least: I figure another week and a half, and I'll be back where I was before.

Did not start running again today. That will probably take place, if not tomorrow, at least next week. Tomorrow I am going to a symposium-thing in the Royal Irish Academy - a couple of lectures on Greco-Roman warfare, in the afternoon. (Technically, this symposium started tonight, but I wasn't going to skip climbing in favour of a lecture, and the morning ones tomorrow do not excite my interest sufficiently for me to crawl out of bed at the break of dawn. Does this make me weak? I suspect it does.)

Saturday, I think, I will take the day to myself and read All the Windwracked Stars.

...This is terribly banal. I wonder if I'll eventually stop writing about minutiae here. It'll be interesting to see if I still feel this way when I'm more awake and less hungry.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Essay-engine: still working. The diasporas essay is now more than half done. I am hopeful of further progress soon. If I can get it wholly done by tomorrow night, I will declare myself satisfied and return to banging my head against imperial Rome.

It's shocking how much conditioning one loses in a fortnight: climbing Tuesday night was made of flail, fail, and other unpleasant words beginning with F. I dread tomorrow, when I will attempt to start running again. I haven't run in the better part of two months, so I anticipate great pain.

In other news, I continue to not write. I have a cunning plan to winkle out some writing time, but it will not start until next week, and it will rely to a large degree on my capacity for a)self-discipline and b)sleep deprivation. (I suspect it will result in me abandoning the internets until the winter holidays, too.) You see, it involves:

- getting up at ten to five in the morning
- writing for an hour before catching the quarter to seven train into college
- arriving at the gym before eight am
- running and stretching for up to an hour
- heading to class/library/study

Also staying in and climbing for a couple of hours for four out of five evenings: so not getting home until eight or nine. I think this may be asking too much of myself, but I'll give it a shot next week, and see how it works. I have a writing itch like you would not believe, but right now I should be studious, and do essays. (I am writing this while I wait for the epiphany that will give me the final third of my essay. Sometimes waiting even works.)




Excellent evening lecture on gladiators, sexuality, and death in the Roman amphitheatre. Particularly of interest were the remarks on the gladiatorial helmet, which concealed the face; status differentials among different types of gladiators; the gladiatorial cemetery at Ephesus; phallic and sexual imagery and gladiators; gladiators, virtus and infames; and submission in bouts, including the role of the editor and the crowd in determining life and death for the defeated.

Great guy giving the lecture, too.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Essay-engine: still working. The diasporas essay is now more than half done. I am hopeful of further progress soon. If I can get it wholly done by tomorrow night, I will declare myself satisfied and return to banging my head against imperial Rome.

It's shocking how much conditioning one loses in a fortnight: climbing Tuesday night was made of flail, fail, and other unpleasant words beginning with F. I dread tomorrow, when I will attempt to start running again. I haven't run in the better part of two months, so I anticipate great pain.

In other news, I continue to not write. I have a cunning plan to winkle out some writing time, but it will not start until next week, and it will rely to a large degree on my capacity for a)self-discipline and b)sleep deprivation. (I suspect it will result in me abandoning the internets until the winter holidays, too.) You see, it involves:

- getting up at ten to five in the morning
- writing for an hour before catching the quarter to seven train into college
- arriving at the gym before eight am
- running and stretching for up to an hour
- heading to class/library/study

Also staying in and climbing for a couple of hours for four out of five evenings: so not getting home until eight or nine. I think this may be asking too much of myself, but I'll give it a shot next week, and see how it works. I have a writing itch like you would not believe, but right now I should be studious, and do essays. (I am writing this while I wait for the epiphany that will give me the final third of my essay. Sometimes waiting even works.)




Excellent evening lecture on gladiators, sexuality, and death in the Roman amphitheatre. Particularly of interest were the remarks on the gladiatorial helmet, which concealed the face; status differentials among different types of gladiators; the gladiatorial cemetery at Ephesus; phallic and sexual imagery and gladiators; gladiators, virtus and infames; and submission in bouts, including the role of the editor and the crowd in determining life and death for the defeated.

Great guy giving the lecture, too.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Three things:

1. Remembrance Day.

2. Possible tomb of Sesheshet.

3. And of less global significance, but vitally important to me: it appears my essay-engine isn't entirely broken, since I made a decent quarter of my diasporas essay today*. It's apparently only AWOL when I try to write coherently about the Roman emperor as a military autocrat in the 1st century CE.

Oh, well. They're both due on the same day, so at least this isn't procrastination.

*It's amazing what you can say about the Pentateuch. No, really. Promise and deferment, landlessness and land as inheritance - I'm running with those themes all the way, which is... pretty decent, actually.
hawkwing_lb: (Default)
Three things:

1. Remembrance Day.

2. Possible tomb of Sesheshet.

3. And of less global significance, but vitally important to me: it appears my essay-engine isn't entirely broken, since I made a decent quarter of my diasporas essay today*. It's apparently only AWOL when I try to write coherently about the Roman emperor as a military autocrat in the 1st century CE.

Oh, well. They're both due on the same day, so at least this isn't procrastination.

*It's amazing what you can say about the Pentateuch. No, really. Promise and deferment, landlessness and land as inheritance - I'm running with those themes all the way, which is... pretty decent, actually.
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
600 words of essay written today. In six hours.

That makes 900 words total in the last five days, not counting notes. Or 30% of the final product.

How freaking pathetic.


Tomorrow I get to go to college and print stuff off, and see if the gym is open for bouldering.

And then I get to try not to spaz out about travelling and missing classes. It doesn't help that the parent seems to think that by travelling alone to not one but two foreign cities, I'm setting myself up to get a)lost, b)stranded, c)abducted, d)murdered, e)all of the above.

If I can't have globe-spanning adventures at the age of twenty-two, when can I have them? Sigh.

Oh, well. I comfort myself with the knowledge that the parent at least cares.


Now I must commence with the obsessive making of lists. No, I don't get nervous about travelling. Nuh-uh. Not at all. Not in the least.

...Why are you looking at me like that?
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
600 words of essay written today. In six hours.

That makes 900 words total in the last five days, not counting notes. Or 30% of the final product.

How freaking pathetic.


Tomorrow I get to go to college and print stuff off, and see if the gym is open for bouldering.

And then I get to try not to spaz out about travelling and missing classes. It doesn't help that the parent seems to think that by travelling alone to not one but two foreign cities, I'm setting myself up to get a)lost, b)stranded, c)abducted, d)murdered, e)all of the above.

If I can't have globe-spanning adventures at the age of twenty-two, when can I have them? Sigh.

Oh, well. I comfort myself with the knowledge that the parent at least cares.


Now I must commence with the obsessive making of lists. No, I don't get nervous about travelling. Nuh-uh. Not at all. Not in the least.

...Why are you looking at me like that?
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
My internets at home appear to be broken. Sigh.

Yesterday's achievements were many.
Read more... )

The future:

Due November 27: one Roman history essay, one Diasporas in Antiquity essay. (c 5.5K of essay)
Due December 1: one Roman history presentation. (c1.0K of words for talking, plus pretty Powerpoint pictures.)
Due January 9: one Paul & early Christianity essay, one Diasporas in Antiquity essay (c 5.0K of essay)
Due January 13: one Roman history presentation written form. (c2.0K of words, plus images)

Hello, research. I will be so glad when I can decide my own.




So, yeah, this is where I become (become? Who am I kidding? I'm already being) boring focus girl. Stand by for weekly updates on the glamorous life of me.

Apart from next week. Hey, lj, anyone interesting going to be at WFC?

(Anyone I might know from this corner of the internets who might say hello?)

(I have passed this off to my lecturers as me, exploring career options in the grand world of publishing. [Otherwise they'd dock me for failure to attend classes, and that could kill my faint hopes of pulling off a big fat "I" at the end of this year.] Of course, we all know that really I'm going because Canada! and smart people talking books! But don't break my cover, k? :P )
hawkwing_lb: (No dumping dead bodies!)
My internets at home appear to be broken. Sigh.

Yesterday's achievements were many.
Read more... )

The future:

Due November 27: one Roman history essay, one Diasporas in Antiquity essay. (c 5.5K of essay)
Due December 1: one Roman history presentation. (c1.0K of words for talking, plus pretty Powerpoint pictures.)
Due January 9: one Paul & early Christianity essay, one Diasporas in Antiquity essay (c 5.0K of essay)
Due January 13: one Roman history presentation written form. (c2.0K of words, plus images)

Hello, research. I will be so glad when I can decide my own.




So, yeah, this is where I become (become? Who am I kidding? I'm already being) boring focus girl. Stand by for weekly updates on the glamorous life of me.

Apart from next week. Hey, lj, anyone interesting going to be at WFC?

(Anyone I might know from this corner of the internets who might say hello?)

(I have passed this off to my lecturers as me, exploring career options in the grand world of publishing. [Otherwise they'd dock me for failure to attend classes, and that could kill my faint hopes of pulling off a big fat "I" at the end of this year.] Of course, we all know that really I'm going because Canada! and smart people talking books! But don't break my cover, k? :P )

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